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            General News » News

            Theatre Aurora’s The Tempest

            March 6, 大中华彩票app下载安装   ·   0 Comments

            A Review by Scott Johnston

            When going to the theatre, sometimes one doesn’t know whether to expect a drama, a fantasy, a tragedy, a comedy, a love story, or a historical tale. For the next two weeks, Theatre Aurora gives us a bit of each of these themes with their latest production of William Shakespeare’s “The Tempest”.

            Written over 400 years ago, “The Tempest” tells the tale of a number of people stuck on an island. The central character is the magical Prospero, the former Duke of Milan, who has been stranded here for 12 years, since his brother Antonio, with the aid of Alonzo, the King of Naples, took over Milan, and set Prospero and his young daughter Miranda adrift at sea.  Two others with them on the island are Caliban, often referred to as “monster”, and the spirit Ariel, who can interact with people, but who has the ability not to be seen.

            Their lives are changed when a shipwreck adds additional characters into their midst, including Antonio, Alonzo, and various other relations, and members of their courts.

            This sets the stage for intrigue, romance, comedy, revenge, magic, and, of course, happy endings.

            In the age of communication by emojis, Shakespeare can sometimes be a bit of a challenge to bring to a modern audience, but director Kris Van Soelen has given us a fun version, starting with the very sensory shipwreck scene.

            From here, great casting takes over.

            Brian Fukuzawa commands the stage, and those around him, as Prospero.

            Andrew Pawarroo, Jamie Sherman and Joey Ferguson provide excellent comic relief as the trio trying to plan a coup against Prospero. Apart from benefitting from Shakespeare’s wonderful wordsmithing, they each display excellent physical comedy. 

            Sherman and Ferguson also do double duty portraying very different characters in another coup-related subplot that includes Tracy McKay as Alonsa and Anna-Rose Holtrop as Bastiana.

            Another actor who brings much physicality to her central role as she interacts with most of the characters is Olivia Jon as Ariel.

            Sarah Abtan and Mike Hunter round out the cast as the young lovers Miranda and Ferdinand, while Aidan Grossman wears a number of hats as several minor characters.

            With great acting, effective special effects, good costumes, a simple set, and of course, an excellently written story, Theatre Aurora’s “The Tempest” makes for an entertaining night at the theatre.

            Evening performances of “The Tempest” continue at Theatre Aurora, 150 Henderson Drive, March 5, 6, 7, 12, 13 and 14, with a matinee on March 8.  Tickets are available through the box office at 905-727-3669.



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